Quality at Vidant Medical Center

We are committed to providing patients a safe and harm-free environment.  Providing optimal care every time is our goal, we measure and report how consistent we are in meeting this standard. Optimal care data is based on national standards that measure whether patients receive all recommended treatments for certain conditions. Our hospital measures optimal care performance in the following clinical areas: heart failure, heart attack, community-acquired pneumonia and surgical care.

Select each optimal care standard below to see how we compare to hospitals, nationally and statewide. More recent data is also provided for each standard.

Note: Once a chart is displayed, you may scroll through all charts by clicking the left or right hand side of the displayed chart.

Heart Attack Optimal Care

View how we compare to state and national averages | View most recent results  

These measures show some of the standards of care provided, if appropriate, for most adults who have had a heart attack:

  • Average number of minutes before outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack who needed specialized care were transferred to another hospital
  • Average number of minutes before outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack got an ECG
  • Outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack who got drugs to break up blood clots within 30 minutes of arrival
  • Outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack who got aspirin within 24 hours of arrival
  • Heart attack patients given fibrinolytic medication within 30 minutes of arrival
  • Heart attack patients given PCI within 90 minutes of arrival
  • Heart attack patients given aspirin at discharge
  • Heart attack patients given a prescription for a statin at discharge

Heart Failure Optimal Care

View how we compare to state and national averages | View most recent results  

These measures show some of the process of care provided for most adults with heart failure:

  • Heart failure patients given discharge instructions
  • Heart failure patients given an evaluation of Left Ventricular Systolic (LVS) function
  • Heart failure patients given ACE inhibitor or ARB for Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction (LVSD)

Community-acquired Pneumonia Optimal Care

View how we compare to state and national averages | View most recent results  

These measures show some of the recommended treatments for pneumonia:

  • Pneumonia Patients whose initial emergency room blood culture performed prior to administration of 1st hospital dose of antibiotics
  • Pneumonia Patients given the most appropriate initial antibiotic(s)

Surgical Optimal Care

View how we compare to state and national averages  |  View most recent results  

Antibiotics are medicines that prevent and treat infections. It is important for surgical patients to receive the right antibiotics at the right time. Here are some examples:

  • Outpatients having surgery who got an antibiotic at the right time (within one hour before surgery)
  • Surgery patients who were given an antibiotic at the right time (within one hour before surgery) to help prevent infection
  • Surgery patients whose preventive antibiotics were stopped at the right time (within 24 hours after surgery)
  • Patients who got treatment at the right time (within 24 hours before or after their surgery) to help prevent blood clots after certain types of surgery
  • Outpatients having surgery who got the right kind of antibiotic
  • Surgery patients who were taking heart drugs called beta blockers before coming to the hospital, who were kept on the beta blockers during the period just before and after their surgery
  • Surgery patients who were given the right kind of antibiotic to help prevent infection
  • Heart surgery patients whose blood sugar (blood glucose) is kept under good control in the days right after surgery
  • Surgery patients whose urinary catheters were removed on the first or second day after surgery
  • Patients having surgery who were actively warmed in the operating room or whose body temperature was near normal by the end of surgery
  • Surgery patients whose doctors ordered treatments to prevent blood clots after certain types of surgeries

Emergency Department Care

View how we compare to state and national averages  |  View most recent results  

Timely and effective care in hospital emergency departments is essential for good patient outcomes. Delays before receiving care in the emergency department can reduce the quality of care and increase risks and discomfort for patients with serious illnesses or injuries. Waiting times at different hospitals can vary widely, depending on the number of patients seen, staffing levels, efficiency, admitting procedures, or the availability of inpatient beds.

The information below shows how quickly the hospitals you selected treat patients who come to the hospital emergency department, compared to the average for all hospitals in the U. S.

  • Average (median) time patients spent in the emergency department, before they were admitted to the hospital as an inpatient
  • Average (median) time patients spent in the emergency department, after the doctor decided to admit them as an inpatient before leaving the emergency department for their inpatient room
  • Average time patients spent in the emergency department before being sent home
  • Average time patients spent in the emergency department before they were seen by a healthcare professional
  • Average time patients who came to the emergency department with broken bones had to wait before receiving pain medication
  • Percentage of patients who left the emergency department before being seen
  • Percentage of patients who came to the emergency department with stroke symptoms who received brain scan results within 45 minutes of arrival

Preventive Care

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Hospitals and other healthcare providers play a crucial role in promoting, providing and educating patients about preventive services and screenings and maintaining the health of their communities. Many diseases are preventable through immunizations, screenings, treatment, and lifestyle changes. The information below shows how well the hospitals you selected are providing preventive services.

  • Patients assessed and given influenza vaccination