Hip fracture - discharge

Alternate Names

Inter-trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Subtrochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Femoral neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - discharge

When You Were in the Hospital

You were in the hospital for surgery to repair a hip fracture, a break in the upper part of your thigh bone. You may have had hip pinning surgery or a special metal plate or rod with screws, called compression screws or nails, put in place. You may have had a hemiarthroplasty to replace the “ball” part of your hip joint.

You should have received physical therapy while you were in the hospital or at a rehabilitation center before going home from the hospital.

What to Expect at Home

Most of the problems that develop after hip fracture surgery can be prevented by getting out of bed and walking as soon as possible. For this reason, it is very important to stay active and follow the instructions your doctor gave you.

You may have bruises around your incision. These will go away. It is normal for the skin around your incision to be a little red. It is also normal to have a small amount of watery or dark bloody fluid draining from your incision for several days.

It is not normal to have foul smell or drainage that last more than the first 3 to 4 days after surgery. It is also not normal when the wound starts to hurt more after leaving the hospital.

Activity

Do the exercises your physical therapist taught you. Your doctor and physical therapist will help you decide when you do not need crutches, a cane, or a walker anymore.

Ask your doctor or physical therapist about when to start using a stationary bicycle and swimming as extra exercises to build your muscles and bones.

Try not to sit for more than 45 minutes at a time without getting up and moving around.

Do not bend at the waist or the hips when you put your shoes and socks on. Do not bend down to pick up things from the floor.

Use a raised toilet seat for for the first couple of weeks. Your doctor will tell you when it is OK to use a regular toilet seat. Do not sleep on your stomach or on the side you had your surgery.

Home Setup

Have a bed that is low enough so that your feet touch the floor when you sit on the edge of the bed.

Keep tripping hazards out of your home.

Put things where they are easy to reach.

Set up your home so that you do not have to climb steps. Some tips are:

If you do not have someone to help you at home for the first 1 to 2 weeks, ask your doctor or nurse about having a trained caregiver come to your home to help you.

Wound Care

You may start showering again about 5 to 7 days after your surgery. Ask your doctor or nurse when you can start. After you shower, gently pat the incision area dry with a clean towel. Do not rub it dry.

Do not soak your wound in a bathtub, swimming pool, or hot tub until your doctor says it is okay.

Change your dressing (bandage) over your incision every day if it is OK with your doctor. Gently wash the wound with soap and water and pat it dry.

Check your incision for any signs of infection at least once a day. These signs include more redness, more drainage, or when the wound is opening up.

Other Self-care

To prevent another fracture, do everything you can to make your bones strong.

Keep wearing the compression stockings you used in the hospital until you doctor says you can stop. Wearing them for at least 2 or 3 weeks may help reduce clots after surgery.

If you have pain, take the pain medicines your doctor prescribed. Getting up and moving around can also help reduce your pain.

If you have problems with your eyesight or hearing, get them checked.

Be careful not to get pressure sores (also called pressure ulcers or bed sores) from staying in bed or a chair for long periods of time.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your doctor if you have:

References

Weinlein. Fractures and dislocations of the hip. In: Canale ST, Beatty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. 12th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2012:chap 55.

Simunovic N, Devereaux PJ, Sprague S, Guyatt GH, Schemitsch E, Debeer J, Bhandari M. Effect of early surgery after hip fracture on mortality and complications: systematic review and meta-analysis. CMAJ. 2010 Oct 19;182(15):1609-16. Epub 2010 Sep 13. Review.


Review Date: 11/15/2012
Reviewed By: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, David R. Eltz, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com