Meckel’s diverticulectomy

Definition

Meckel's diverticulectomy is surgery to remove an abnormal pouch on the lining of the small intestine (bowel). This pouch is called a Meckel's diverticulum.

Description

You will receive general anesthesia before surgery. This will make you sleep and unable to feel pain.

Surgeons can also do this surgery using a laparoscope. A laparoscope is a tiny camera that is inserted into your belly through a small cut. Video from the camera will appear on a monitor in the operating room. The surgeon uses the monitor to do the surgery. In surgery using a laparoscope:

Why the Procedure Is Performed

Treatment is needed to prevent:

The most common symptom of Meckel's diverticulum is painless bleeding from the rectum. Your stool may contain fresh blood or look black and tarry.

Risks

Risks for any anesthesia are:

Risks for any surgery are:

Risks for this surgery are:

Before the Procedure

Always tell your doctor or nurse:

During the days before your surgery:

On the day of your surgery:

After the Procedure

Most people stay in the hospital for 1 to 7 days depending on how extensive the surgery was. During this time, the doctors and nurses will carefully monitor you.

Treatment may include:

You will be also given fluids and nutrition through a vein (IV) until your doctor or nurse hears bowel sounds. These sounds mean your bowels are active again. Passing gas or having a bowel movement is a sign of bowel activity. Once this happens, you can starting eating by mouth.

You will need to follow up with your surgeon 7 to 10 days after surgery for testing.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Most people who have a Meckel's diverticulectomy have a good outcome. But the results of any surgery depend on your overall health. Talk with your doctor about your expected outcome.

References

McKenzie S, Evers BM. Small intestine. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery. 19th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2012:chap 50.


Review Date: 12/10/2012
Reviewed By: Robert A. Cowles, MD, Associate Professor of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, David R. Eltz, and Stephanie Slon.
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