Hepatitis C

Definition

Hepatitis C is a viral disease that leads to swelling (inflammation) of the liver.

Other types of viral hepatitis include:

Causes

Hepatitis C infection is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). You can catch hepatitis C if the blood of someone who has hepatitis C enters your body. Exposure may occur:

People at risk of hepatitis C are those who:

Symptoms

Most people who are recently infected with hepatitis C do not have symptoms. Some people have yellowing of the skin (jaundice) that goes away. Chronic infection usually causes no symptoms. But tiredness, skin disorders and other problem can occur. Persons who have long-term (chronic) infection often have no symptoms until their liver becomes scarred (cirrhosis). Most people with this condition are ill and have many health problems.

The following symptoms may occur with hepatitis C infection:

Blood tests are done to check for hepatitis C:

  • EIA assay to detect hepatitis C antibody
  • Hepatitis C RNA assays to measure virus levels (viral load)

Genetic testing is done to check for the type of hepatitis C (genotype). Six genotypes exist (genotypes 1 through 6). Test results can help your doctor choose treatment that is best for you.

The following tests are done to identify and monitor liver damage from hepatitis C:

Treatment

Common medicines used include peginterferon and antiviral drugs. These medicines are aimed at:

For these medicines to work best, you need to take them as instructed by your health care provider. Ask what side effects you can expect and what to do if you have them.

liver transplant may be recommended for persons who develop cirrhosis and liver cancer. Your health care provider can tell you more about liver transplant.

If you have hepatitis C:

Support Groups

Joining a support group can help ease the stress of having hepatitis C. Ask your health care provider about liver disease resources and support groups in your area.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Most people with hepatitis C infection have the chronic form. Persons with genotype 2 or 3 are more likely to respond to treatment than those with genotype 1.

The goal of treatment is to reduce the chance of liver damage and liver cancer. A good response to treatment occurs when the virus is no longer detected in the blood after treatment. New and more effective medicines are being developed. As a result, more and more persons with HCV are able to avoid serious liver damage and even liver cancer.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if:

Prevention

Things that can be done to prevent the spread of hepatitis C from one person to another include:

If you or your partner is infected with hepatitis C and you have been in a stable and monogamous (no other partners) relationship, the risk of giving the virus to, or getting the virus from, the other person is low.

Hepatitis C virus cannot be spread by casual contact, such as holding hands, kissing, coughing or sneezing, breastfeeding, sharing eating utensils or drinking glasses.

Currently there is no vaccine for hepatitis C.

References

Ghany MG, Strader DB, Thomas DL, Seeff LB. American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. Diagnosis, management, and treatment of hepatitis C: an update. Hepatology. 2009;49:1335-1374.

Jou JH, Muir AJ. In the clinic. Hepatitis C. Ann Intern Med. 2008;148:ITC6-1-ITC6-16.

O'Leary JG, Davis GL. Hepatitis C. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap 79.

Rosen HR. Clinical practice. Chronic hepatitis C infection. N Engl J Med. 2011;364(25):2429-38.


Review Date: 11/16/2012
Reviewed By: George F. Longstreth, MD, Department of Gastroenterology, Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, San Diego, California. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, David R. Eltz, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.
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